Ray T. Mahorney (rmahorney) wrote in pcs_ready_link,
Ray T. Mahorney
rmahorney
pcs_ready_link

Cellphones add TV, radio to repertoire

[This mostly involves expensive services that cell phone companies want to
sell. What I can't figure out is who would want to buy them. Adding a tv or
fm radio tuner to a cell phone to allow free OTA reception could be a
desirable feature. But spending an extra $15/month plus Pay Per View
charges to have radio or tv streamed to your phone makes no sense to me.]

Page 4B

Cellphones add TV, radio to repertoire
By Jefferson Graham
USA TODAY

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[This mostly involves expensive services that cell phone companies want to
sell. What I can't figure out is who would want to buy them. Adding a tv or
fm radio tuner to a cell phone to allow free OTA reception could be a
desirable feature. But spending an extra $15/month plus Pay Per View
charges to have radio or tv streamed to your phone makes no sense to me.]

Page 4B

Cellphones add TV, radio to repertoire
By Jefferson Graham
USA TODAY

<a href="http://www.usatoday.com/printedition/money/20050315/4b_phones_15.art.htm>"USA TODAY </a>


Coming soon to a cellphone near you: baseball games, music, TV shows and
shared digital pictures.

New phones in small packages that do a lot more than just let people talk
were unveiled Monday at the wireless industry's Cellular Telecommunications
and Internet Association (CTIA) trade show in New Orleans. Entertainment
companies are among those on hand to take advantage of the new possibilities.

.Major League Baseball cut a deal with MobiTV, a fledging provider of TV
clips for phones, to offer video coverage of games. No pricing was
announced. Audiocasts of games now cost $7.99 on top of MobiTV's monthly
$9.99 charge.

Verizon Wireless is augmenting its "V Cast" TV clip feature with highlights
from Fox's Paris Hilton/Nicole Richie series The Simple Life. The clips
will sell for $1 each, on top of the monthly $15 subscription.

.America Online cut a deal with Cingular Wireless for its subscribers to
share digital photographs from AOL's AIM instant message program from PCs
to phones and vice versa.

.Phone manufacturers are showing off models with increased internal memory,
allowing for storage of pictures, music and video clips. The new LG VX-8100
phone has a built-in 1.3-megapixel camera (megapixels measure a camera's
resolution), 512 megabytes of internal flash memory and a memory card slot.
Most camera phones have memory in the 16 MB to 32 MB range. The phone is
expected to be in stores by next month.

"The phone is rapidly morphing into the everything device," says Scott
Ellison, an analyst with market tracker IDC. "The big three things here at
the show are music, watching TV on the phone and picture sharing."

Some 150 million camera phones were sold last year, according to IDC. But
most consumers do little with their images because the transfer process
hasn't been made easy for them.

Indeed, at the show, Kodak cited an internal survey saying as many as 68
billion photographs were taken on camera phones last year, but 70% of users
said they rarely were shared with friends.

AOL's wireless initiative is "a very clever way of driving people to start
sending pictures in a mobile context," Ellison says. "They're already
familiar and comfortable with AIM on the PC. This takes IM to the next level."

AOL has a big booth at the CTIA show and is showing off technology to put
its collection of more than 200 Internet radio stations onto phones.
"Download the application, and your cellphone is now a radio," says Himesh
Bhise, general manager of AOL's mobile division. He predicts AOL Radio will
be on phones by midyear.
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